My Payday Loan My Payday Loan

Calendar

November 2013
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Medical Bills: Are We Really Better Off With the Mechanic?

Dr. Davis Liu has an interesting blog on the trend towards asking patients to “shop around” for their healthcare, comparing it to a recent visit to his mechanic:

My car dealer service advisor returns. The battery and the fog light are not available until the next day. It will take him at least until tomorrow . . . → Read More: Medical Bills: Are We Really Better Off With the Mechanic?

Battle of the Newspaper Medicare Coverage

James Fallows of The Atlantic Monthly ran a comparison of the major newspapers and their Medicare coverage from this last week:

Overall front-page lead story in the WaPo: “Medicare’s future appears brighter”.

#2 off-lead front page story in the NYT: “Report Shows Better Outlook for Medicare”.

The new Medicare assessment does make a cameo . . . → Read More: Battle of the Newspaper Medicare Coverage

Obamacare: We Pay HOW Much More for Healthcare?

Interesting story in The New York Times this weekend, on how much the U.S. pays for some healthcare services compared to other countries. Warning: it’s not pretty:

Deirdre Yapalater’s recent colonoscopy at a surgical center near her home here on Long Island went smoothly: she was whisked from pre-op to an operating room where a . . . → Read More: Obamacare: We Pay HOW Much More for Healthcare?

The Oregon Health Experiment: Does It All Boil Down to An Air Conditioner?

When it comes to the healthcare debate, Governor John Kitzhber of Oregon loves to tell a story about an air conditioner:

As it turns out, I have heard the air-conditioner story. Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber (D) loves to tell the air-conditioner story. He loves to tell it so much, in fact, that it has become . . . → Read More: The Oregon Health Experiment: Does It All Boil Down to An Air Conditioner?

Is a Single-Payer System Still on the Table?

Just a reminder that some folks are still trying to keep the single-payer dream alive:

Wes Brain was uninsured last winter when a tonsillectomy showed signs of throat cancer. He qualified for the high-risk Oregon Medical Insurance Pool, which the state has administered through Regence BlueCross BlueShield.

But gaining access to that insurance soon proved . . . → Read More: Is a Single-Payer System Still on the Table?

The Oregon Medicaid Lottery, a Winner’s Story

There’s been a lot of talk about the so-called Oregon Experiment. Oregon conducts an annual lottery for a few precious spots in its state Medicaid program. Recently, a group of researchers looked into the program, as a look as to whether an expanded Medicaid makes any difference to people’s health.

Well, Kaiser Health News . . . → Read More: The Oregon Medicaid Lottery, a Winner’s Story

U.S. Prescription Drug Spending Per Capita Drops… For the First Time

It may not feel like it, but per capita U.S. prescription drug spending has dropped for the first time ever:

Americans’ per capita spending on prescription drugs fell last year for the first time on record, according to a report released Thursday by the IMS Institute For Healthcare Informatics firm headquartered in Danbury, Conn., which . . . → Read More: U.S. Prescription Drug Spending Per Capita Drops… For the First Time

It’s Official… Hospital Prices Are All Over the Place

If you thought hospital prices have no rhyme or reason, it turns out you’re right:

What do you think of hospital prices? Tell us about it in our discussion forum!

Are Americans Trapped By Their Health Insurance?

Much of the healthcare debate has centered on the question of “choice,” but are we trapped already?

There’s a man who hates his job. Oh, there are lots of them but this guy can’t quit and his boss knows it. His son has asthma and has been in and out of the hospital since . . . → Read More: Are Americans Trapped By Their Health Insurance?

Healthcare: Can the Patient Ever Really Say No?

Ezra Klein of The Washington Post breaks down some of the conundrum:

Health care is an unusual product in that it is difficult, and sometimes impossible, for the customer to say “no.” In certain cases, the customer is passed out, or otherwise incapable of making decisions about her care, and the decisions are made by . . . → Read More: Healthcare: Can the Patient Ever Really Say No?